28 Eylül 2006 Perşembe

The Turkish Military and the Consolidation of Democracy

The Military and the Consolidation of Democracy: The Recent Turkish Experience

Metin Heper, Bilkent University
Aylin Guney, Bilkent University


Armed Forces & Society, Vol. 26, No. 4, 635-657 (2000)

Abstract
Turkey's recent success in dealing with the threat of political Islam without the military taking power into its own hands cannot be explained by either of the two contending theories about the military's role in the consolidation of democracy, that of the "mode-of-transition" or that of "electoral dynamics." Following the transition to democracy, officers in Latin America have evinced politically elite characteristics and have been in a tug of war with civilian politicians; officers in Eastern Europe have shown non-elite (professional) characteristics and have been subordinated to civilian politicians; officers in Turkey, not unlike their counterparts in France and Germany of earlier decades, have displayed state-elite characteristics and maintained their privileged position in the polity. Thus, while it is possible to use the dichotomy of politicized versus professional militaries to explain the fortunes of democracy in Latin America and Eastern Europe, respectively, in Turkey it is necessary to analyze the factors determining the orientation of officers toward democracy.

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"Civilianization" in Greece versus "Demilitarization" in Turkey: A Comparative Study of Civil-Military Relations and the Impact of the European Union

Özkan Duman, Bilkent University
Dimitris Tsarouhas, University of Sheffield


Armed Forces & Society, Vol. 32, No. 3, 405-423 (2006)

Abstract
The civil-military-relations literature has long concentrated on domestic factors in explaining the relationship between civilians and the military. This article concentrates on the effect of an external actor, the European Union (EU), on civil-military relations in Greece and Turkey. The main findings reveal that the two countries shared similar characteristics until the mid-1970s. However, their path of civil-military relations diverged considerably as soon as Greece’s EU membership prospect became tangible. While in the Greek case, "civilianization" took place, Turkey had witnessed a mere "demilitarization" of its regime. However, the article also shows how EU membership paves the way for the improvement of civil-military relations in the Turkish case.

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Turkey’s EU Candidacy and Civil-Military Relations: Challenges and Prospects

Aylin Güney, Bilkent University
Petek Karatekelioglu, Bilkent University


Armed Forces & Society, Vol. 31, No. 3, 439-462 (2005)

Abstract
This article examines the Turkish case within the framework of theories that explain the impact of transnational factors upon civil-military relations in national contexts. The authors examine the impact of Turkey’s European Union (EU) membership candidacy on civil-military relations in Turkey. More specifically, they elaborate on the challenges and prospects for more democratic civil-military relations in Turkey as triggered by the EU candidacy. In this regard, the article examines the notion of guardianship that characterizes the military’s traditional role in Turkish politics and its institutional reflections.

Full-text available, click here.
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1 yorum:

Anonymous dedi ki...

Soros demokrasisi "gururla" sunar. ...

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